With an Experience Modification Rating (EMR) of 0.63, Henderson Building Solutions stands well above the construction industry average of 1.0. EMR is primarily used to determine insurance premiums based on the number of on-the-job injuries in the past and the likelihood of similar occurrences in the future. The lower the score, the better.

“Higher EMR shows a higher likelihood of accidents, so our 0.63 rating speaks volumes about how effective our safety program is,” explained Tracy Wagoner, the electrical and elevator technical leader at Henderson Building. “Ensuring everyone is out of harm’s way is something we take very seriously.”

In addition to earning better insurance premiums for Henderson Building, Wagoner explained that a low EMR gives the firm a competitive advantage when vying for projects.

“On top of our expertise and credentials, the score is a way of showing we know what we’re doing out in the field,” he said. “EMR is especially important when securing work within the federal, state, and healthcare sectors, which typically have strict requirements. It makes sense because safety mishaps can directly affect people’s welfare. For example, if an accident cuts off the power supply at a hospital, patients are put in danger. The same sensitivity applies to critical infrastructure like data centers, where a mistake can cripple business operations.”

Wagoner largely credited Henderson Building’s exceptional EMR rating to the firm’s emphasis on safety training. During the company’s monthly safety meetings, discussions are structured as an open forum where employees can freely ask questions and share ideas. This is coupled with training on specific field categories to achieve the highest level of safety awareness among staff.

“There is no such thing as a stupid safety topic during our meetings,” said Wagoner, who outlined a wide range of subjects they cover including how to stay hydrated, treating insect bites, and electrical safety. “We also aren’t shy about showing real world examples of the consequences of letting your guard down. And we make it clear that employees have our full support if they need to make workplace adjustments for safety reasons. It can be anything from taking an additional break to rest to getting rid of a component that seems faulty.”

Project-specific safety meetings are held at job sites before kickstarting each project as well as after completion to review key learnings. Staff members are also given opportunities to attend safety meetings held by contractor firms to broaden their exposure to proper safety protocol.

Furthermore, all Henderson Building field employees are required to complete safety and health hazard training offered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the federal agency that establishes standards to ensure safe working conditions. OSHA 10-hour training is mandatory for a majority while those in leadership must complete the agency’s 30-hour program.

“The OSHA requirement is completed independently,” noted Wagoner. “The idea is to give employees an added sense of responsibility because they’re taking an active role in their welfare. We’ve noticed a higher level of awareness and knowledge from it. This makes blunders less likely because staff can easily distinguish between what is normal versus what is unusual and unsafe.”

Above all, Wagoner pinpointed a people-first approach as being vital.

“If someone gets hurt, it impacts morale, slows down a project, and has healthcare costs associated with it,” he said. “But most importantly, someone’s life is impacted. So, we don’t think twice about investing time and money toward safety because the toll of an injury is major. I strive to never have an incident where anyone on my team is seriously hurt and my colleagues feel the same. We’re always looking out for each other and our great EMR score is an indication of that.”

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